24 thoughts on “SEO Best Practice Strategies for 2014 with Rand Fishkin of MOZ

  1. Robert O'Haver

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply
  2. Katherine Tattersfield

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply
  3. SEO

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply
  4. Rosso Rosso Digital Media Consultancy

    What are the social media content trends for 2014? Find out in this talk
    from The Moz CEO.

    Reply
  5. Janina Jurado

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply
  6. Allan Fuelling

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply
  7. Peter Nikolow

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply
  8. Wheel Media

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply
  9. JDR Group

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply
  10. Thrive Business Marketing

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply
  11. Bev Bilac

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply
  12. Bruce Clay, Inc.

    SEO Best Practice Strategies for 2014 with +Rand Fishkin of +Moz SEO Best
    Practice Strategies for 2014 with Rand Fishkin of MOZ

    Well worth the 34-minute time investment.

    #SEO #guestblogging 

    Reply
  13. William Rock

    In case you missed this ish yesterday, SEO Hhangout with +Rand Fishkin & +Robert
    O’Haver

    Rand more or less agrees with the Content Shock scenario put forth by Mark
    Schaefer. Basically, the fact that we’re all publishers makes for content
    overload as well as poor output.

    I agree that content marketing is highly demanding; many will discover they
    can’t keep producing consistent quality content and simply give up.

    If you think you’re in danger of jumping off the content cliff, I say scale
    it back. Yes, it’s better to have fresh content on your blog 3 times a
    week, but not at the expense of your audience. If you’re pressed for
    time/resources, spend the whole week on one epic post instead of 3
    acceptable articles.

    I’m still aiming for 3 blog posts per week, and I find myself devoting way
    more time to the articles than I did 6 months ago. I used to crank out a
    post in about an hour—-lately a single post takes up the majority of my
    day.

    No issues there if you’re a freelancer (I presume?) For us in-house
    marketers, I think it’s time to have a sit down with the higher ups. I
    don’t know about anybody else, but I have a hard time explaining that you
    can’t create epic shit in an hour.

    Thoughts?

    (p.s. my question comes at the very end. It was prompted by the phrase
    “link earning.” I think I earn a link when I guest post. I don’t write
    crap, and I often design an image to go along with my copy. How much would
    people pay for this service that I’m supposed to offer for nothing more
    than the promise of exposure now? As much as I love writing and design, I
    don’t think a single link at the bottom of a page is asking too much.
    Apparently I’m in the minority on this one.)

    Reply

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